Welcome!

Welcome to the Holbrook lab! We study the physics and physiology of vascular transport in plants with the goal of understanding how constraints on the movement of water and solutes between soil and leaves influences ecological and evolutionary processes. Currently, we are working on questions relating to cavitation, stomatal mechanics, leaf hydraulic design, and xylem evolution.

Holbrook Lab 2016
Lab photo 2016. Top row: Teressa Alexander, Cynthia Gerlein-Safdi, Greg Ceccantini, Jess Gersony, Alexandre "Pono" Ponomarenko, Walton "Tinker" Green. Bottom row: Nathan Mueller, Kadeem Gilbert, Fulton "Tony" Rockwell, Noel Michele "Missy" Holbrook, Uri Hochberg, Clement Quintard, Yongjiang "John" Zhang. Not pictured: Laura Clerx, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Juan Losada, Bridget Power and Jessica Savage

Recent Publications

Knoblauch, Michael, Jan Knoblauch, Daniel L Mullendore, Jessica A Savage, Benjamin A Babst, Sierra D Beecher, Adam C Dodgen, Kaare H Jensen, and Noel Michele Holbrook. 2016. “Testing the Münch hypothesis of long distance phloem transport in plants.” eLife 5. Abstract

Long distance transport in plants occurs in sieve tubes of the phloem. The pressure flow hypothesis introduced by Ernst Münch in 1930 describes a mechanism of osmotically generated pressure differentials that are supposed to drive the movement of sugars and other solutes in the phloem, but this hypothesis has long faced major challenges. The key issue is whether the conductance of sieve tubes, including sieve plate pores, is sufficient to allow pressure flow. We show that with increasing distance between source and sink, sieve tube conductivity and turgor increases dramatically inIpomoea nil. Our results provide strong support for the Münch hypothesis, while providing new tools for the investigation of one of the least understood plant tissues.

Rolland, V., D.M. Bergstrom, T. Lenne, G. Bryant, H.Chen, J. Wolfe, M. N Holbrook, D. E. Stanton, and M.C. Ball. 2015. “Easy Come, Easy Go: Capillary Forces Enable Rapid Refilling of Embolized Primary Xylem Vessels.” Plant Physiology American Society of Plant Biologists , 1636-1647. Abstract

Protoxylem plays an important role in the hydraulic function of vascular systems of both herbaceous and woody plants, but relatively little is known about the processes underlying the maintenance of protoxylem function in long-lived tissues. In this study, embolism repair was investigated in relation to xylem structure in two cushion plant species, Azorella macquariensis and Colobanthus muscoides, in which vascular water transport depends on protoxylem. Their protoxylem vessels consisted of a primary wall with helical thickenings that effectively formed a pit channel, with the primary wall being the pit channel membrane. Stem protoxylem was organized such that the pit channel membranes connected vessels with paratracheal parenchyma or other protoxylem vessels and were not exposed directly to air spaces. Embolism was experimentally induced in excised vascular tissue and detached shoots by exposing them briefly to air. When water was resupplied, embolized vessels refilled within tens of seconds (excised tissue) to a few minutes (detached shoots) with water sourced from either adjacent parenchyma or water-filled vessels. Refilling occurred in two phases: (1) water refilled xylem pit channels, simplifying bubble shape to a rod with two menisci; and (2) the bubble contracted as the resorption front advanced, dissolving air along the way. Physical properties of the protoxylem vessels (namely pit channel membrane porosity, hydrophilic walls, vessel dimensions, and helical thickenings) promoted rapid refilling of embolized conduits independent of root pressure. These results have implications for the maintenance of vascular function in both herbaceous and woody species, because protoxylem plays a major role in the hydraulic systems of leaves, elongating stems, and roots.

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